North Weald Airfield Museum is a registered charity, No. 1081157.  Run and staffed by volunteers and Grant Aid Funding assisted by EFDC.



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James M Fowler said on Aug 3, 2012 8:34 PM

When I was posted to MOD Main Building May 1966 I was in AIrmans Married Quarters at 31 Campsite North Weald. at the time it was under care and maintenance with the parent unit RAF Debden. The barrack warden was a Mr Price, a very helpful man. I have happy memories of North Weald, my youngest son was born there, or rather at the maternity hospital at Epping just down the road from North Weald. I also remember the Pub the Kings Head just a short walk from my house.. I was then a corporal Telegraphist 1 working in the Defence Communications Centre MOD. I was there fro a year till I was posted to Aden in 1967.

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Theresa Rowe said on Jul 19, 2012 1:52 PM

My Father was a flight engineer for 111 Sqadren and my sister was born on the base. His name was George Logan Allan and I would like to find more information about him and the time I lived on the base from 1953 to 1955. Our house almost backed onto the air field and I had many happy times on open days when the displays were on and sat in a Lancaster Bomber and worked the flaps. Still fills me with pride when I go to Licolnshire and see the only one left flying.

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William Charles Roe. said on Jul 16, 2012 8:37 PM

I served most of my National Service at North Weald as an armourer in the station armoury. I was there from Spring 1953 until my demob 11 December 1955. During my time there, I saw the arrival of Roger Topp swooping over the airfield in a Canberra (yes). From then on I saw 111 squadron converted from Meteors, to the Hawker Hunters and the subsequent forming of the Black Arrows. Not matter where you were working on the airfield (and us armourers got around), a Hunter coming in would stop you in your tracks and you would be compelled to watch it until it landed. I would gladly provide any other memories I have if you should so wish. I have a sketch here that I made of my 'pit' in the H blocks that provided our accomadation. I would gladly send you a copy of this.

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John O.Wille said on May 6, 2012 8:42 AM

sergeant John Bernard Gilhuus 332 Squadr 1942, dead Dec.17. 1944 , was my uncle, mother`s brother. She is still living at the age of 98! John and my mother and cpt. Finn Thorsager was growing up together.

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Janet Rampley said on Feb 18, 2012 3:46 PM

I am at the moment looking at my fathers RAF service record and the name North Weald appers on it three times during 1941, late 1943 and again in 1944. I am trying to make sense of the record and I wonder if there is anyone who could help me.

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Cate Mooney said on Dec 16, 2011 9:48 PM

My uncle John "Jack" Mooney served there with the 121 Eagle Squadron and was KIA on June 16, 1942. Here's some info about his service: On June 22, 1940, John Mooney, a resident of Hempstead, New York and his friend George Masse, from Central Falls, Rhode Island, enlisted in the RCAF at Montreal. Mooney was assessed: “Sole desire is to fly. War is secondary. Not exceptionally good material.” While training at No. 4 SFTS, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Mooney and Masse tried unsuccessfully to cross into the United States. Masse sent a telegram to the Station Adjutant: “S/P Mooney and myself can’t get into United States unless we each have an affidavit stating we are on leave and have permission to wear civilian clothes. Can you send us such a letter?” The buddies received their pilot wings February 17, 1941. Mooney was selected for fighter training and posted to No. 56 Operational Training Unit, while Masse was posted to an Operational Training Unit to become a bomber pilot. Mooney’s Operational Training Assessment was forwarded to the Officer Commanding No. 121 Eagle Squadron. “Above average. A very steady pilot who is good both individually and when working with other people. Very keen and should make a very good pilot.” On August 8, 1941, while on a patrol, Sergeant Pilot Mooney shared a probable Ju.88. He experienced a close call during a November 27 sweep. He described the incident in an article published in the Washington Post. “I was flying low over some fighting boats near the Dutch coast when I flew among some seagulls and saw one go apparently through my propeller. “Later, when I attacked gun posts, my engine cut out and gave off black smoke every time I put the nose down. I couldn’t figure it out until I got back and found a gull – or rather feathers, for that was all that was left of it – jammed in my air intake. “During the attack, the plane was blown over on its back by ack-ack, the radio was smashed and the craft was riddled. I got back by skimming the waves all the way.” RCAF-trained No. 121 Eagle Squadron Pilot Officers Mooney, Thomas Allen of Louisburg, North Carolina, Clifford Thorpe of Ohio, and Bradley Smith of Yonkers, New York participated in a low-level sweep into France February 18, 1942. British Air Ministry reported in a low-level attack on one factory, the pilots encountered rifle and machine gun fire. Moving on to attack a second factory, they destroyed a German sentry and attacked a locomotive which, as reported in the New York Times, “was fired on so low the pilot almost hit the signal arm”. On March 23, 1942, United Press London reported Pilot Officer Mooney and his fellow No. 121 Eagle Squadron pilots flew their Spitfires over London in celebration of “Warships Week,” and then headed for France. During the ensuing sweep, Pilot Officer Mooney recorded his first aerial victory, destroying a FW190. He described the encounter in the United Press report: “Two Huns came at me. I went into a tight turn over the coast and lost one of them. The other fellow was still coming at me. I turned again and he went in front. I gave him a burst and he rolled over on his back and then dived into the sea.” The Squadron was escorting Boston bombers to France on June 8 when Pilot Officers Mooney and Mahon (see Cathi’s note on this guy below) each destroyed two FW190’s. (downed in the Saint-Omer area) Eight days later, during a June 16 Rhubarb, recently-promoted Flight Lieutenant Mooney was killed when the Spitfire he was piloting was hit by flak. The New York Times reported a fellow Eagle Squadron pilot who was flying with Mooney stated: “We had just peppered the hell out of a Nazi gunpost with our cannons and machine guns and, although we ran into flak, we both seemed to get away all right. That’s the last I saw of him.” Squadron Leader Hugh Kennard wrote a letter to F/L Mooney’s father. “It is with deep regret that I have to inform you that your son, Jack is missing. He left here on the 16th June for an operation over enemy occupied territory, the same as he had done on many previous occasions, and he was well experienced. Pilots who were with him at the time, last saw him after crossing the enemy coast line, but after that time he was not seen again. “As you know, Jack was recently made a Flight Lieutenant, and one of my Flight Commanders, which shows what an able pilot and keen officer we thought of him over here. “On a recent fighter sweep, he himself destroyed two enemy fighters within five minutes of each other, which brought his total score to three enemy fighters destroyed, two probably destroyed and one damaged, which in so short a spell of operations is quite an achievement. “I have no doubts that he would have been allowed to carry on, his record would have been a distinguished one. Your son must have told you in letters home that he was going to be married; the date was settled for July 4th. I met his proposed wife, and I am sure you would have thoroughly approved of his excellent choice. “Once again, I would like to express the sympathy of all the other members of 121 Eagle Squadron at the loss of a very fine man and friend.” Flight Lieutenant Mooney’s friend, Flight Sergeant George Masse was killed January 17, 1942 while serving with No. 405 Squadron RCAF.

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Bill Beer said on Dec 12, 2011 11:59 AM

My uncle, LAC Frederick Sharp (Transport Command), was stationed at RAF North Weald for a time after his return from North Africa in 1946, before being transferred to RAF Hunsdon. I would welcome any information about his time there as he passed away recently.

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Hanne Holm-Johnsen said on Oct 5, 2011 12:20 PM

My father, Arne Sverre Holm Johnsen (1920-2000) was a technician for the 331 squadron. He came from "Little Norway" Toronto, Canada in 1943 (?) and, I think, was part of the 6331 Echelon in 1944. He followed the squadron to some other airfield before the invation and to France in august 1944.

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John S Spray said on Sep 26, 2011 1:56 PM

I was posted to North Weald in March 1953 after we were flooded out of RAF Felixtowe in February 1953. I worked in the Metropolitan Sector Operations Centre underground Bunker at Kelvedon Hatch. A good National Service posting. North Weald was our home base.

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Mr. T.R.LEWIS. said on Jul 22, 2011 10:40 AM

Done some Nat.Service at North Weald.1956 Servicing 111.Sqn. Hunters. Display Team. Just wish to know if a Black Arrow Hunter still exists, at a museum I could visit. L.A.C. LEWIS. 2783583.

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